have


have
have, hold, own, possess, enjoy are comparable when they mean to keep, control, retain, or experience as one's own.
Have is the most general term and in itself carries no implication of a cause or reason for regarding the thing had as one's own
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he has considerable property

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they have five children

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we have no cow at present

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have opinions on a subject

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she has many friends

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they are going to have a baby

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he has no French

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we shall have some trouble with it

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Hold implies stronger control over than have and usually suggests a grasp upon, an occupancy of, or a bond between; thus, "to have friends" implies a mere amicable relationship, but "to hold one's friends" implies either the reducing of them to subjection or the retaining of their affection; "to have an opinion" implies merely the existence of that opinion, whereas "to hold an opinion" usually suggests its assertion
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hold extensive properties in New York State

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once did she hold the gorgeous East in fee— Wordsworth

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the Breton seized more than he could hold; the Norman took less than he would have liked— Henry Adams

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the receptive imagination . . . holds fast the visions genius creates— Eliot

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Own implies a natural or legal right to hold as one's property and under one's full control
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own a house

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own several horses

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when a child is old enough, he should ... be allowed to own books— Russell

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some parents treat their children as if they owned them

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Possess is preferred in law to own as implying one's having full title and right to a particular property to the exclusion of everyone else; thus, a husband and wife might say that they own a piece of land when legally only the husband possesses it. In general use possess differs from own in being referable to other things than property (as a characteristic, a quality, a power, or a faculty)
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possess contentment

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the States possessed the power to exclude or admit them [slaves]— John Marshall

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that astonishingly retentive memory which we possessed as little boys— Inge

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the great medicinal value possessed by this water— Heiser

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Enjoy (see also LIKE) implies the having of something as one's own or for one's use with all its benefits and advantages; in this sense there is no necessary connotation of pleasure or delight in having or using, but, except in law, the word often does carry a hint if not a definite suggestion of it
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during his lifetime he enjoyed a distinguished reputation for the excellence of his sermons— T. S. Eliot

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while man enjoyed ... an unlimited freedom to be wicked— Henry Adams

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classes that enjoy certain rights and privileges

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Contrasted words: want, *lack, need

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Have — (h[a^]v), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Had} (h[a^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Having}. Indic. present, I {have}, thou {hast}, he {has}; we, ye, they {have}.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben (imperf. h[ae]fde, p. p. geh[ae]fd); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Have — Have, lat., sei gegrüßt! lebe wohl! Auf Grabmälern: have pia anima! lebe wohl, fromme Seele! …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • Have — (ave, lat.), sei gegrüßt! lebe wohl! bes. auf Grabsteinen: H. pia anima (lebe wohl liebe Seele); vgl. Ave Maria …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Have — (lat.), soviel wie Ave …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Have — (ave, lat.), Sei gegrüßt! Lebe wohl! H. pia anĭma, Lebe wohl, fromme Seele! …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • have — /hav/; unstressed /heuhv, euhv/; for 26 usually /haf/, v. and auxiliary v., pres. sing. 1st pers. have, 2nd have or (Archaic) hast, 3rd has or (Archaic) hath, pres. pl …   Universalium

  • have — I. verb (had; having; has) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English habban; akin to Old High German habēn to have, and perhaps to hevan to lift more at heave Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. to hold or maintain as a possession,… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • have it — {v. phr.} 1. To hear or get news; understand. * /I have it on the best authority that we will be paid for our work next week./ 2. To do something in a certain way. * /Make up your mind, because you can t have it both ways. You must either stay… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • have it — {v. phr.} 1. To hear or get news; understand. * /I have it on the best authority that we will be paid for our work next week./ 2. To do something in a certain way. * /Make up your mind, because you can t have it both ways. You must either stay… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Have — Heins von Have (* 1906 in Hamburg; † 1995) war als Kaufmann in Batavia (Niederländisch Indien) tätig, wo er nach Ausbruch des Zweiten Weltkrieges zunächst von den Niederländern, später dann in Britisch Indien von den Engländern interniert wurde.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • have on — {v.} 1. To be dressed in; wear. * /Mary had on her new dress./ 2. To have (something) planned; have an appointment; plan to do. * /Harry has a big weekend on./ * /I m sorry I can t attend your party, but I have a meeting on for that night./ 3.… …   Dictionary of American idioms


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